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An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

Erstellt von Serge, 24.05.2010, 04:18 Uhr · 7 Antworten · 1.064 Aufrufe

  1. #1
    Avatar von Serge

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    An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Friday, May 21, 2010
    An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    I am writing you this letter because in the past six weeks I have often been angry. I've often been disappointed, disillusioned, and frustrated. But there was only one moment in this entire agonizing sequence that moved me to tears. That was when your leader, Veera Musikaphong, surrendered to the authorities, and spoke of his dreams, his disappointments, and his enduring hopes.

    As the smoke dies down, you are going to be told that you were lied to, duped, tricked, bought and betrayed; that you were tools of evil men who did not truly care about your fate; that you are terrorists, arsonists, destroyers of our culture, king-haters. It will be said that you destroyed the country's international image and obstructed its economic recovery. Worst of all, you will be told that you are all ignorant people who have misused your political voices because you didn't understand democracy.

    I am afraid that in many cases, the people who say these things will be telling the truth. The instant rebirth that you wanted for our country has turned out to be more of a false dawn. Many crimes have been committed and both sides have hidden important facts from each other.

    Even though these things are in many cases true, I want you to know that they have not invalidated other truths: the truths that you carried in your hearts when you set out to air your grievances in a peaceful demonstration.

    The doors that should have opened for you years ago, when this country became a democracy, have opened too slowly. The education that you need to become equal participants in society has been withheld too long. The voice that you have always had has been discovered too late, and because it was so long pent up, it is been expressed destructively. And the worst destruction was not that of a few shopping malls and banks; it was the destruction you wreaked upon yourselves.

    But I want you to know that when it comes to the liberation of the human spirit, history is on your side. The road towards a more perfect democracy may be difficult, but it is unstoppable. You did not lose this war. But I hope you will have learned from it. The question is not whether the war will be won, but how it will be won: through mayhem and bloodshed, or through slow, painful discussion and compromise — through evolution — the civilized way.

    It may be hard for you to believe this, but many people who have been painted as your enemies share your most cherished dreams. For example, I sincerely believe that the prime minister, K. Abhisit, comes philosophically closer to those dreams than a number of your leaders. If he did not — if his mindset had been that of some of the military dictators Thailand has had in the past — the carnage of the last few days would have been unconscionable.

    I also believe that many of your leaders, like K. Veera, share the hopes and dreams of those not affiliated with your movement, because they are, by and large, the hopes and dreams of all Thai people: to live in peace, not to spend your life in a mindless struggle to survive, to have the same chance as anyone else at realizing your aspirations and becoming fulfilled human beings.

    It may be too soon to hope for this, because the mutual anger and distrust are still too great. If K Veera is found guilty of any crimes, justice will have to be served, just as much as if K Suthep were found to have abused his authority. But it would be a beautiful thing to see idealists like K. Veera playing a role in an Abhisit government. Such a compromise occurred in Italy decades ago, and it saved their country from a potentially disastrous internecine struggle.

    You have changed Thailand for ever by discovering, and showing your fellow citizens, that you have the right to think, and to speak, and to act. I urge you to go further. Keep thinking. But think for yourselves. Don't think what you're told to think. Speak what you think, not what you are told to speak. And act with your minds as well as your hearts, and in the interests of all, even those whom you disagree with.

    Not many people in Bangkok would feel grateful to you at this moment. But I do want to thank you. What you did was really important, though perhaps not for the reasons you think. And I want to explain why.

    When you build a road, you will sometimes come to a mountain. To get to the other side, you may have to go around it. You may have to dig a tunnel. Or you have to blow up the mountain.

    Thailand has come to that mountain. But for at least two decades, no one has been willing to go around, dig a tunnel, or blow up the mountain. Yet everyone knows we must get through. The mountain is in the way. Some past governments have stolen your money to build golden hot-air balloons so that a few individuals could get across, not caring if the rest were stranded. Others have talked and talked and talked, but the mountain is still there. Of course you are impatient.

    You didn't blow down the mountain, but the tragic events that have unfolded have convinced everyone that it is time to move on. Your people — and the soldiers, too — did not suffer and die in vain. Though we seem to be in darkness and chaos, a fuller democracy is closer today than it has been at any time during the Thaksin administration and all its successors. There will come a time when people will realize that you opened their eyes, that you all contributed to this major turning point in Thailand's history. In time, the rest of the nation will understand it, and come to acknowledge it, and even embrace it. For in embracing those we thought our enemies, we really embrace ourselves.

    A shop owner in Central World.

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  3. #2
    Avatar von waanjai_2

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    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Der angebliche Shopowner ist Somtow Sucharitkul (S.P. Somtow). Mehr über den Open Letter und die sonstigen Unternehmungen von Somtow Sucharitkul erfährt man hier:
    http://www.somtow.org/2010/05/open-l...ed-shirts.html

  4. #3
    thurien
    Avatar von thurien

    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    ein Sena S.R. kommentiert Mr. Somchow's "open" letter:

    "I cannot help but seeing parallels between your language and of colonialism. The way you speak of the peasants is the same that white colonialists used when speaking about 'underdeveloped' nations in the last century"

    somit stellt Sena S.R. in seinem/ihrem Leserbrief die Erkenntnis heraus, daß die Chinesen in diesem Lande unverändert gerne im Schema einer Kolonialmacht denken (u. handeln)

  5. #4
    Avatar von Micha

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    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    waanjaj, danke für den Link.

    Dort gibt es auch eine thailändische Version des Briefes.

    Andere Leute haben den Text für den Autor ins Thailändische übersetzt.

    Warum der Mann in Englisch statt in Thai schreibt, habe ich noch nicht begriffen.

    Seine Erklärung zu der Übersetzung schreibt er auch wieder in Englisch.

    A group of people have worked to translate my words into Thai. I´m told it was a "team effort involving lots of brilliant people" but the person who initiated the translation didn´t identify them. It gets across what I have been trying to say very well, and I hope that it can reach those it is intended for.

  6. #5
    Avatar von waanjai_2

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    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Zum besseren Verständnis auch seiner Bemühungen, zu einem ausländischen Publikum zu sprechen, ist es vielleicht hilfreich zu wissen, dass er jemand ist, der sehr aktiv medienpolitisch aktiv ist. So war er erst gestern in einer Veranstaltung der Fakultät für Journalismus und Massenkommunikation der Thammasat Universität tätig.
    http://www.nationmultimedia.com/home...-30130098.html

    Da ging es mal wieder um das ständig "verzerrte Bild", das die ausländischen Medien von Thailand zeichnen würden. Zuletzt ja ganz massiv entfacht durch die Berichterstattung von CNN über die Maßnahmen des Militärs zur Beendigung der Rothemden-Proteste, wo Sniper der Armee auf die Leute schießend gezeigt wurde.


    Damit war ja der Bericht sofort "unten durch" und vergleichbar einem ausländischen Bericht über die "häßlichen Deutschen". Andere "Haare in der Suppe" mußten dann zu ihrer vollen staatspolitischen Bedeutung stehen.

    Ein leidiges Thema für die Thais im gelben Lager. Weil für die ja schon allein die Tatsache, dass so viele Thais ausländische Medien zur Kenntnis nehmen (ihren eigenen Medien nicht trauen), ein Ärgernis ist.

    Der arme Somtow Sucharitkul soll nun u.a. tragfähige Lösungsvorschläge entwickeln.

  7. #6
    Avatar von Samuianer

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    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Zitat Zitat von waanjai_2",p="862268
    Zum besseren Verständnis auch seiner Bemühungen, zu einem ausländischen Publikum zu sprechen, ist es vielleicht hilfreich zu wissen, dass er jemand ist, der sehr aktiv medienpolitisch aktiv ist. So war er erst gestern in einer Veranstaltung der Fakultät für Journalismus und Massenkommunikation der Thammasat Universität tätig.
    http://www.nationmultimedia.com/home...-30130098.html

    [highlight=yellow:d3cdf38176]Da ging es mal wieder um das ständig "verzerrte Bild", das die ausländischen Medien von Thailand zeichnen würden. [/highlight:d3cdf38176]Zuletzt ja ganz massiv entfacht durch die Berichterstattung von CNN über die Maßnahmen des Militärs zur Beendigung der Rothemden-Proteste, wo Sniper der Armee auf die Leute schießend gezeigt wurde.


    Damit war ja der Bericht sofort "unten durch" und vergleichbar einem ausländischen Bericht über die "häßlichen Deutschen". Andere "Haare in der Suppe" mußten dann zu ihrer vollen staatspolitischen Bedeutung stehen.

    Ein leidiges Thema für die Thais im gelben Lager. Weil für die ja schon allein die Tatsache, dass so viele Thais ausländische Medien zur Kenntnis nehmen (ihren eigenen Medien nicht trauen), ein Ärgernis ist.

    Der arme Somtow Sucharitkul soll nun u.a. tragfähige Lösungsvorschläge entwickeln.
    Ja Herr Waaninger, du wirst das schon richten - aeh' alle Nicht-pro-Rotjoeppchen Mob - richten!


    Ich frage mich immer wieder was du in diesem "schrecklichen Land", mit dieser "grauslichen, menschenfeindlichen Militaerdiktatur" eigentlich noch willst - deine regierungsfeindlichen, alles verdrehende, "schoenes"? -Thailand Demagogie ist kontraproduktiv, du bist der Mann mit der Benzinflasche - willst du die totale Revoluztion , als Gast in diesem Land?

    Ich habe fuer dich ein schoenes VDO von deinem Herrn und Gebieter, dem Mann der angeblich "echte Demokratie" einfuehren moechte, die ja schon waehrend seiner Amtszeit voll zur Bluete und Hochglanz kam so z.B. im "Krieg gegen Drogen" - an die 3000 aussergerichtliche Hinrichtungen, "Friedensbemuehungen" im Sueden "Tak Bai" mit 85 Toten und Krue Sae Massaker unter dem von Takhsin eingesetzten, Panlop Pinmadee General A.D. der wenig spaeter abgesetzt wurde, weil sein Fahrer, mit einem Fahrzeug in dem 67kg "Sprengstoff" gefunden wurden, fleissig immer und immer wieder um die Residenz von Thakisn munter seine Runden drehte...... (Komis nis?)

    Das VDO - eine seiner Ansprachen an seine Rotjoeppchen Soeldner:

    [youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBDm-jA3N80&feature=player_embedded#![/youtube]



    Ausserdem ist Somtow weder damit "beauftragt" tragfähige Lösungsvorschläge zu entwickeln, noch "arm", er komponiert u.A. "Musik/Opern/Operetten", betreibt diesen Blog und sieht sich mit seinem "open letter..." ganz in den Brennpunkt der Versoehnungsanstrengungen bewegt und wird nun durch die Medien gepumpt.

    In seinem Blog geht er weiter auf die Situation aus SEINER SICHT ein:


    When you watch a red shirt rally, notice how many English signs and placards there are, and note that they they are designed to show that these are events conforming to the archetype. The placards say "Democracy", "No Violence," "Stop killing innocent women and children" and so on. Speakers are passionately orating, crowds are moved. But there are no subtitles. What does it look like?


    The answer is obvious. It looks like oppressed masses demanding freedom from an evil dictator.


    Don't blame Dan Rivers, et al, who are only doing what they are paid to do: find the compelling story within the mass of incomprehensible data, match that story to what the audience already knows and believes, and make sure the advertising money keeps flowing in.


    A vigorous counter-propaganda campaign in clear and simple English words of one syllable has always been lacking and is the reason the government is losing the PR war while actually following the most logical steps toward a real and lasting resolution.


    If the foreign press were in fact able to speak Thai well enough to follow all the reportage here coming from all sides, they would also be including some of the following information in their reports. I want to insist yet again that I am not siding with anyone. The following is just information that people really need before they write their news reports.


    -- Thaksin was democratically elected, but became increasingly undemocratic, and the country gradually devolved from a nation where oligarchs skimmed off the top to a kleptocracy of one. During his watch, thousands of people were summarily executed in the South of Thailand and in a bizarre "war on drugs" in which body count was considered a marker of success.

    weiter geht es hier:
    http://www.somtow.org/

    ab (etwa) Mitte:

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010
    Don't Blame Dan Rivers


    Hier macht er einige hoch interessante Aufwuerfe, ueber die ganze Geschichte Takhsin-Coup-neue Konstitution-Gelb-Rot-Medien!





    -- the coup that ousted Thaksin was of course completely illegal, but none of the people who carried it out are in the present government.


    -- the yellow shirts' greatest error in moulding its international image was to elevate Thaksin's corruption as its major bone of contention. Thai governments have always been corrupt. The extent of corruption and the fact that much of it went into only one pocket was shocking to Thais, but the west views all "second-rate countries" as being corrupt. Had they used the human rights violations and muzzling of the press as their key talking points, the "heroic revolution" archetype would have been moulded with opposite protagonists, and CNN and BBC would be telling an opposite story today.


    -- the constitution which was approved by a referendum after the coup and which brought back democracy was flawed, but it provided more checks and balances, and made election fraud a truly accountable offense for the first time.


    -- the parliamentary process by which the Democrat coalition came to power was the same process by which the Lib Dems and Tories have attained power in Britain. The parliament that voted in this government consists entirely of democratically elected members.


    -- no one ever disputed the red shirts' right to peaceful assembly, and the government went out of its way to accede to their demands.


    -- this country already has democracy. Not a perfect one, but the idea of "demanding democracry" is sheer fantasy


    -- the yellow shirts did not succeed in getting any of their demands from the government. The last two governments changed because key figures were shown to have committed election fraud. They simply did not take their own constitution seriously enough to follow it.
    Saturday, May 22, 2010
    Permission to Quote
    In response to the requests I have had to reprint some of the entries in this blog, I would like to say this: anyone may reprint individual blog entries, quote from the blog or translate it as long as the author's name and the original site is credited and the words "quoted by permission of the author" or other such language is included. Thank you.
    Posted by Somtow Sucharitkul (S.P. Somtow)

    aus selbigen Blog

    --------------------------------

    P.S. wer sich mit der englischen Sprache schwer tut - laest es einfach und denen es "zu lang ist" auch!






    @Micha: Somtow ist Thai-US-Amerikaner und wie er erklaert kann er wohl Thai sprechen und verstehen aber nicht lesen und schreiben!

  8. #7
    Avatar von waanjai_2

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    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Zitat Zitat von Samuianer",p="862630
    "Tak Bai" mit 85 Toten und Krue Sae Massaker
    Bei diesen Stichworten fällt mir wieder siedend heiß die Frage ein, hat denn nun der Abhisit nun - seitdem er es kann - sich ganz mächtig für die Aufklärung der Delikte eingesetzt? Und somit die Untersuchungen des Ombudsmans wieder aufgenommen, die schon während der Amtszeit von Thaksin mit ziemlich konkreten Ergebnissen begonnen wurden?

  9. #8
    Bukeo
    Avatar von Bukeo

    Re: An Open Letter to the Red Shirts

    Zitat Zitat von waanjai_2",p="863318
    Bei diesen Stichworten fällt mir wieder siedend heiß die Frage ein, hat denn nun der Abhisit nun - seitdem er es kann - sich ganz mächtig für die Aufklärung der Delikte eingesetzt?
    wenn man ihn endlich mal arbeiten lassen würde, wäre es ev. schon geklärt.
    Jetzt kommt möglichweise halt die AUfarbeitung des Drogenkriegs vorher dran. Man sollte hier ev. AI einbinden, die haben lt. eigenen Angaben erdrückende Beweise gegen Thaksin - aber da ist TH wohl vermutlich wieder zu stolz, Hilfe von aussen anzunehmen.

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