Seite 6 von 8 ErsteErste ... 45678 LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 51 bis 60 von 71

Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

Erstellt von Samuianer, 22.04.2009, 08:54 Uhr · 70 Antworten · 2.796 Aufrufe

  1. #51
    Avatar von alhash

    Registriert seit
    17.12.2001
    Beiträge
    4.824

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Zitat Zitat von Tschaang-Frank",p="716335
    ALLE THAIS die ich hier in Deutschland kenne, also alle die hier ( nicht geboren ! ) seit 5-10-15 Jahren leben, finden es sehr angenehm das es hier Sozialleistungen gibt aber letztendlich koennen sie gerne darauf verzichten wenn sie den ganzen Buerokratenmist, Verordnungen, Verbote, Gesetze.... hier ( und in anderen europaeischen laendern ) sehen. Viele sagen ( und machen es auch ) ich will wieder nach Hause , .... auf Krankenversicherung..... ich will wieder Leute mit meiner Kultur, Mentalitaet....
    Da habe ich gegensätzliche Erfahrungen gemacht. Habe einige Thais gesehen, die sagen, warum soll ich nach Thailand, hier habe ich alles was ich brauche, die Communitiy ist auch vorhanden, in TH erwarten sie von mir nur Gegenleistungen.

    Und was die in meinen Umkreis lebenden Farangs betrifft, denen geht es wahlweise links oder rechts am Steiß vorbei, was sich in der hiesigen Politik abspielt.

    Die Alltagsprobleme, Stress mit der Mia/Familie, wo bekomme ich ne gute Wurst/Schinken, wo gibt es Werkzeug in guter Qualität, usw, etc., überlagern den ganzen Mist, der hier so abgelassen wird.

    AlHash

  2.  
    Anzeige
  3. #52
    petpet
    Avatar von petpet

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    wo bekomme ich ne gute Wurst/Schinken,
    Die Probleme möchte ich auch, BITTE!!

  4. #53
    KKC
    Avatar von KKC

    Registriert seit
    11.12.2006
    Beiträge
    10.670

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Nachdem Chum Phae ja wohl bald einen Big C bekommt, ist das Problem von Alhash ja bald gelöst. :-)
    Gruß

  5. #54
    Avatar von alhash

    Registriert seit
    17.12.2001
    Beiträge
    4.824

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    @KKC,

    das glaube ich erst, wenn der Laden wirklich dort steht. Zu oft wurde schon über den Bau eines Lotus/BigC oder einer eigenständigen Provinz ChumPhae gemunkelt

    Nun wollen wir uns aber wieder Khun Wongnongtoey widmen...

    AlHash

  6. #55
    Avatar von Tschaang-Frank

    Registriert seit
    26.05.2004
    Beiträge
    4.213

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Da habe ich gegensätzliche Erfahrungen gemacht. Habe einige Thais gesehen, die sagen, warum soll ich nach Thailand, hier habe ich alles was ich brauche
    Natuerlich ! Ich habe es ein bissel zugespitzt, man(n) muss 120% geben wenn man(n) 100% erreichen will

  7. #56
    Bukeo
    Avatar von Bukeo

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Zitat Zitat von Tschaang-Frank",p="716316

    Wenn Thailand so waere wie westliche "Demokratien" , wenn die Menschen von der Mentalitaet her auch nur annaehrend wie die deutschen waeren, wuerde mich das Land gleich NULL interessieren

  8. #57
    Avatar von waanjai_2

    Registriert seit
    24.10.2006
    Beiträge
    26.303

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Wo wir schon so eng beim Thema geblieben sind - hier geht´s weiter mit dem Totalen Krieg gegen die ausl. Journalisten.

    Media caught in the middle of Thai conflict
    By Shawn W. Crispin/Southeast Asia Representative

    The media have become part and parcel of Thailand´s intensifying political conflict: Two privately held satellite television news stations are openly aligned with competing political street movements, and state-controlled outlets are under opposition fire for allegedly misrepresenting recent crucial news events.

    As the conflict escalates and the government reverts to crude censorship and veiled threats, all kinds of journalists here are bracing for what they fear could be an assault on their ability to neutrally gather and present the news, and a blow to press freedom.

    On April 12, Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva declared a state of emergency that paved the way for a crackdown on anti-government street protesters who had surrounded Government House, blockaded main roads in Bangkok and violently disrupted an Asian summit meeting outside the capital city. As part the declaration, the Thai government issued a decree that empowered officials to censor news considered a threat to national security. Authorities employed the censorship powers to block a satellite television station, three community radio stations, and more than 70 Web sites considered to be aligned with exiled former premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who was deposed in a 2006 military coup. At least three pro-Thaksin community radio station operators were temporarily detained during the crackdown.

    Officials justified the censorship for reasons of national security, claiming that certain media outlets had sown chaos and incited violence. The banned broadcaster, D Station, had carried live Thaksin´s video call-ins from exile and on April 8 more than 100,000 of his United Front for Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD) protest movement´s supporters gathered in the streets of Bangkok to listen to his televised address.

    That night, he called on his red shirt-wearing supporters to rise up in a "people´s revolution" against Abhisit´s government. The televised call set the stage for the April 13 military crackdown, when soldiers clashed with demonstrators wielding Molotov cocktails in a pre-dawn raid. More than 100 demonstrators were injured in the melee, many seriously; the government and military claimed nobody was killed and that soldiers only fired blanks into the crowd.

    Thaksin and UDD leaders hotly contested that official account, claiming in interviews with international media, including the BBC and CNN, that many protesters were shot, killed, and hauled away in military trucks. They claimed the local media, including state-controlled television stations, was complicit in a government cover-up of the news.

    The army owns mainstream channels 5 and 7, while other government agencies own channels 3, 9, and the former Channel 11, now known as the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand. International media and wire agencies that covered the crackdown did not corroborate Thaksin´s claims in their reports.


    One Bangkok-based foreign diplomat, who spoke with CPJ on condition of anonymity, would not entirely rule out that a few protesters may have been killed in the early morning melee, based on the Thai military´s poor human rights record. The same diplomat, however, questioned the authenticity of hazy video footage circulated by the Thaksin-aligned opposition Peua Thai party, which politicians cited as evidence that the military had killed several demonstrators. The government said after a parliamentary debate last week that it will launch an independent probe into the crackdown.

    Certain prominent Bangkok-based foreign journalists sense a pro-government bias in local media coverage of recent events. Foreign Correspondents Club of Thailand President Marawan Macan-Markar wrote in an April 19 news article for Inter Press Service that the censorship of D Station had "inadvertently exposed the bias that grips local media."

    "Mainstream print and broadcast media were not censored [but] they had portrayed the Democrat Party-led coalition in a positive light," he wrote.

    Abhisit lifted the state of emergency on April 24, but officials continued to block D Station. It was unclear whether the three community radio stations it raided and shuttered during the emergency were back on air. The government lifted its censorship over the 71 Thaksin-aligned Web sites it had earlier blocked, according to the Thai Netizen Network, an Internet freedom advocacy group.

    Other politically aligned media are also under threat. The leader of the competing People´s Alliance for Democracy (PAD) street movement and owner of the ASTV satellite television station, Sondhi Limthongkul, narrowly escaped an assassination attempt in a pre-dawn assault on his car on April 17. Army commander General Anupong Paochinda told local media that assault rifle shells found at the crime scene were marked from the army´s 9th Infantry Division. Police are now investigating the incident.

    ASTV was instrumental in broadcasting the PAD´s anti-government protests last year, which culminated in the seizure of Bangkok´s international and domestic airports and the collapse of two Thaksin-aligned governments. More recently, ASTV´s commentators had sharply criticized the military and police for failing to maintain security during UDD protests, which, in recent weeks, have twice damaged the prime minister´s motorcade.

    It´s against this chaotic backdrop that many Bangkok-based journalists fear a wider media crackdown could be coming. The signals from the government are ominous. Minister Satit Wongnongtaey in the prime minister´s office told local media last week that the government was "watching some sections of the foreign media who are in and outside of Thailand who act [as if they] serve Thaksin."

    Satit said the government had recently established a "war room" and launched a "full scale" information war to counter Thaksin´s claims carried in the foreign media. He went on to say that the government would soon identify certain foreign journalists who he alleged had backed Thaksin and damaged the country.

    Foreign reporters in Thailand are required to renew their visas and work permits annually and must submit copies of their recent journalism for Foreign Ministry scrutiny and approval. But even if the government steers clear of its threat to target certain foreign journalists, it´s nonetheless clear that the media will remain uncomfortably in the middle when reporting on Thailand´s polarizing and escalating conflict.

    (Reporting from Bangkok)

    http://cpj.org/blog/2009/04/media-ca...i-conflict.php

    Ich habe mir erlaubt, auf zwei Passagen durch Unterstreichung gesondert hinzuweisen:
    a. auf die Aussagen über die Eigentumsverhältnisse hinsichtlich der thail. Medien und zur besseren Einschätzung der wohl überproportional wichtigen ausl. Presse
    b. auf die Aussagen über die Pressionen, die ausl. Journalisten hinsichtlich der Verlängerung ihrer Aufenthaltstitel unterliegen. Gleiches gilt ja auch für die Expats - obwohl ich über Vergleichbares hier noch nie etwas gelesen habe. Vielleicht schon alles verdrängt.

  9. #58
    Bukeo
    Avatar von Bukeo

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Zitat Zitat von waanjai_2",p="721709
    Wo wir schon so eng beim Thema geblieben sind - hier geht´s weiter mit dem Totalen Krieg gegen die ausl. Journalisten.
    alles kein Problem, vermutlich werden heuer noch Neuwahlen ausgerufen - danach wird alles besser

  10. #59
    Avatar von waanjai_2

    Registriert seit
    24.10.2006
    Beiträge
    26.303

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Ja, soll das denn noch auf ewig weitergehen mit den ausl. Journalisten? Hat man denn nicht oft genug schon geäußert, dass man so Äußerungen wie die folgenden, irgendwie nicht gutheißen wolle noch könnte?
    Die verstehen die Thai irgendwie nicht. Scheint wohl ein grundsätzliches Problem zu sein. Hat der Kasit gesagt. Aber heute wieder dies: Oh my Buddha.

    "Thailand's trajectory changed with the decision to mount an unconstitutional coup against the prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra, first elected in 2001 and resoundingly re-elected in 2005. The billionaire businessman was a polarising leader. He was wildly popular with the rural poor and the working class, but bitterly opposed by the urban elites and the army.

    The decision to send the army to remove him came from the royal palace. The last time the king had intervened decisively in politics was to end a violent constitutional crisis. This time he provoked one."
    http://www.smh.com.au/opinion/thaila...p.html?page=-1

  11. #60
    Bukeo
    Avatar von Bukeo

    Re: Minister Sathit Wongnongtoey erklaert den

    Zitat Zitat von waanjai_2",p="723524
    Ja, soll das denn noch auf ewig weitergehen mit den ausl. Journalisten? Hat man denn nicht oft genug schon geäußert, dass man so Äußerungen wie die folgenden, irgendwie nicht gutheißen wolle noch könnte?
    Die verstehen die Thai irgendwie nicht. Scheint wohl ein grundsätzliches Problem zu sein.
    dass das Ausland die Thais bzw. deren Kultur und Mentalität nicht versteht, dürfte klar sein. Wurde auch schon mehrmals in den Medien darüber berichtet, das man westl. Demokratie in Thailand nur dann umsetzen könnte, wenn man Kultur und Mentalität der Bevölkerung ausradiert.


    "Thailand's trajectory changed with the decision to mount an unconstitutional coup against the prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra,
    das ist hier auch die Frage, ob der Coup überhaupt verfassungswidrig war.
    Lt. thail. Verfassung ist diese zu schützen, sogar notfalls mit Gewalt. Dieser Passus wurde erst in der neuen Militär-Verfassung abgemildert.
    Da Thaksin die Verfassung gebogen hat, wie er es für richtig hielt - war der Coup ev. sogar verfassungskonform.

    The decision to send the army to remove him came from the royal palace.
    tja, soll er halt den König verklagen :-)

Seite 6 von 8 ErsteErste ... 45678 LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Webseite von Khattiya erklaert 53 Personen als markiert!
    Von Samuianer im Forum Thailand News
    Antworten: 17
    Letzter Beitrag: 07.03.10, 07:34
  2. Hua Hin zu Katastophengebiet erklaert!
    Von Samuianer im Forum Thailand News
    Antworten: 9
    Letzter Beitrag: 15.12.08, 21:06
  3. Antworten: 3
    Letzter Beitrag: 25.08.08, 07:42
  4. Reiche Minister
    Von garni1 im Forum Thailand News
    Antworten: 2
    Letzter Beitrag: 03.12.06, 19:52
  5. Letter To The Prime Minister
    Von x-pat im Forum Treffpunkt
    Antworten: 3
    Letzter Beitrag: 08.02.05, 12:31