Seite 1 von 39 12311 ... LetzteLetzte
Ergebnis 1 bis 10 von 385

Education in Thailand: A Terrible Failure

Erstellt von waanjai_2, 30.05.2013, 08:13 Uhr · 384 Antworten · 29.464 Aufrufe

  1. #1
    Avatar von waanjai_2

    Registriert seit
    24.10.2006
    Beiträge
    26.303

    Education in Thailand: A Terrible Failure

    Wat is dat denn?
    Die New York Times sorgt für mehr Oeffentlichkeit hierbei

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/29/wo...nted=all&_r=1&

    Rein äußerlich gesehen hat sich an den Schulen in Udon nichts verändert. Jeden Nachmittag sieht man die Horden der Schülerinnen und Schüler in ihren Uniformen.
    Die Jungs auch oft in kurzen Hosen mit Kniestrümpfen.

  2.  
    Anzeige
  3. #2
    Avatar von DisainaM

    Registriert seit
    15.11.2000
    Beiträge
    26.857
    wobei der Artikel aus thailändischer Sicht, gefiltert,
    von einem erfolgreichen thailändischen Studenten,
    der an der Uni Hamburg studiert,
    und nebenher als Korrespondent für grosse Nachrichtensender arbeitet,

    Currently, Saksith is a reporter for Channel NewsAsia and has covered the visits of US President Barack Obama to Bangkok and Yangon, Myanmar and the anti-government Pitak Siam rally in 2012. He covered the Thai general elections and the flood crisis in 2011 as a producer for IHA, a stringer for Channel NewsAsiaand a fixer for ITN.He has also appeared on Al Jazeera English, BBC World Service and Radio Australia. Prior to blogging, Saksith worked as a local reporter in his hometown Bremen, Germany, and also worked as an editorial assistant for Asia News Network in Bangkok, Thailand.
    Saksith splits his time between Bangkok, Thailand and Hamburg, Germany, where he is studying Southeast Asian Studies for a Magister Atrium degree at Universität Hamburg.
    About/Contact | Saiyasombut



    sich auf folgende Punkte bezieht,

    The fight against Thailand’s archaic and militaristic education system | Saiyasombut

    sind IMO Nebenkriegsschauplätze,

    denn ob die Schüler nun Uniformen tragen, ihre Fingernägel kontrolliert werden,
    und die Schulbildung auf einem niedrigen Niveau abläuft,

    sind nicht die entscheidenen Punkte.

    Die Frage ist, wie eine Veränderung des Schulsystems aussehen sollte,
    wenn sie thai-kultur-konform ablaufen sollte.

    Wenn eine Kultur die Bewahrung des kreng Chai Prinzipes als Paradigma erhebt,
    welchen Sinn macht es, die Schüler zum Bücherlesen und zum aktiven Schulunterricht zu bewegen,
    wenn dieser aktive Schulunterricht nicht kulturkonform ist.

    besser, man wendet sich von den theoretischen Gedankenspielen weg,

    und konzentriert sich auf die Realität,

    und die sieht so aus :

    Wird Staatlich geprüfter Betriebswirt als Universitätsabschl

  4. #3
    Avatar von MadMac

    Registriert seit
    06.02.2002
    Beiträge
    22.422

    Education in Thailand: A Terrible Failure

    Ich mach dann doch mal einen eigenen Thread daraus, hatte das schon kurz bei den Professoren im Isaan versenkt, da geht es aber auch wirklich unter. Der Beitrag ist in Englisch, aber Google uebersetzt das immer gern (Link am Ende).

    Quelle: Education in Thailand: A Terrible Failure

    Education in Thailand: A Terrible Failure

    The Thai Education System is One of the Worst in S.E. Asia and is Worsening Every Year

    Cassandra James, Yahoo! Contributor Network

    I taught in the Thai education system for more than three years and during this time learned quickly how bad the education system in Thailand really is. Plagued by inadequate funding, huge class sizes (more than 50 students to a class), terrible teacher training, lazy students and a system that forces teachers to pass students even though they've actually failed - there doesn't seem to be much hope education in Thailand will improve any time soon.I taught in a private bi-lingual school, so had many less problems than exist in government schools. Even here though, the school falls under Ministry of Education bureaucracy, which is one of the most ridiculously inept in the world. Rules change every semester, new guidelines are handed down to teachers regarding course content, lesson plans, testing etc at the beginning of each new semester, then change again the following semester. Teachers are told to pass students, even though they've failed, and a blind eye is turned to serious problems like plagiarizing.

    Every year, the Ministry of Education brings into effect another bright idea for improving education in Thailand. This year's bright idea is to force every Western teacher teaching in Thailand to take a Thai Culture course. Regardless that many teachers have been here for years and are well-versed in Thai culture, in order to get a teacher's license or renew one, they will be forced to take this course. As the course costs between $110 and $300, money that has to be paid by the teacher, many teachers are saying they will not do it. I already know of two excellent teachers who have left Thailand to go to Korea and Japan to teach instead.

    In most other countries in South East Asia, Western teachers are paid more, it's easier to get work permits with less hoops to jump through, and the Ministry of Education in these countries is much more forward thinking. Thailand already has problems getting and keeping good, qualified Western teachers. Implementing this new law will simply mean even more of these teachers will go elsewhere.

    In most countries, government organizations are known to not be particularly effective. The Ministry of Education in Thailand though, is the worst government organization I have ever dealt with. When I was teaching at my last school, I was approached for help in English grammar one day by the Thai computer teacher who was very upset because he'd just been chastised by a representative from the Ministry of Education. The Ministry representative had seen some work he had been doing with the kids and had told him very rudely that he should make sure the English wording on the kids' Mother's Day greeting cards was correct. This coming from a representative of an organization that routinely sends forms in English to Western teachers that don't have even one grammatically correct English sentence on them. Some of them were so unintelligible my boss would just chuck them in the nearest garbage can.

    Thailand is now facing a crisis in education. Thai students are not taught to think for themselves so have no critical thinking skills. At government schools, more than 50 students in a class is the norm. Half the kids just sleep through class, as the teacher doesn't notice if they're listening or not. Books are limited, science equipment doesn't exist in a lot of schools, and Western teachers in government schools are often the dregs of society. But as the schools can't afford to pay more than $750 a month, they get what they pay for. (Many of these 'teachers' are old men without college degrees who simply came to Thailand because of the Thai women, then ended up teaching as it's one of the few jobs Westerners are allowed to do).

    In order to try to solve the problem of unqualified Western teachers, Thailand is now clamping down on tourist visas. These unqualified teachers cannot get work permits so they live here on tourist visas, leaving the country and renewing them every 3 months. Now it's going to be more difficult to do this. However, the only thing this new tourist visa restriction will do is to penalize the true tourist to Thailand. The guys who are getting them illegally, will just choose to stay in Thailand illegally, so nothing will change.

    Meanwhile, education in countries such as Vietnam, Malaysia, Korea and China is improving in leaps and bounds. Thailand is set to fall to the bottom of the pile of southeastern Asian countries both educationally and economically, yet the government and the Education Ministry wastes their time on ridiculous new rules, instead of a more common sense way of dealing with things.
    Firstly, if the government simply mandated that a college degree and a TEFL certificate were the basic qualifications to teach in Thailand, this would rid them of most of the Western men here who aren't qualified to teach. Secondly, if they increased teacher salaries for both Thais and Westerners, they would get better qualified teachers. As it stands right now, Thai schools pay the exact same low wages they did when I came here five years ago. Yet prices in the last five years have gone up more than 20%. Thirdly, if the government made getting a work permit easy for qualified individuals, instead of the mess it is now, teachers would come here and would stay. But at the moment, you can get a visa, work permit and a better paying job in Korea, China, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Japan. So why come to Thailand?

    However, things are not likely to change in Thailand any time soon. Thai society is all about saving face and appearance is everything. The Ministry never listens when it's given advice by teachers who know better than them what Thai education needs. And as long as the way a kid looks is more important than what the kid knows, Thailand's education system is a lost cause. Thailand will continue to fall further behind in the education game and the better Western teachers will continue to leave. But hey, who cares, at least the kids look cute when they're all parading around in their Scouts uniforms. Just a pity less than 10% can actually speak more than 20 words of English correctly and a lot of them aren't very good at Thai either.

    Google Uebersetzung:
    Bildung in Thailand: A Terrible Failure - Yahoo! Voices - voices.yahoo.com

    (Heute gefunden auf FB, danke Gabriel!)

  5. #4
    Avatar von strike

    Registriert seit
    08.12.2007
    Beiträge
    28.011
    Aber richtig schoene Uniformen haben sie, die Lehrer in TH.
    Da duerfte es nicht viele Laender geben, die TH da Paroli bieten koennen.

    Nachtrag: gerade gestern mit einem thailaendischen Lehrer gesprochen, der mir als des Englischen maechtig angekuendigt war.
    So war es nicht schlimm, dass ich "can not speak Thailand".

  6. #5
    Avatar von MadMac

    Registriert seit
    06.02.2002
    Beiträge
    22.422
    Zitat Zitat von strike Beitrag anzeigen
    Aber richtig schoene Uniformen haben sie, die Lehrer in TH.
    Da duerfte es nicht viele Laender geben, die TH da Paroli bieten koennen.
    Die Uniformen haben die doch alle, egal ob Lehrer, Dorfvorsteher, Schrankenwart oder Schreibtischfutzi. Der Beitrag sagt's ja auch. Alles Show, nichts dahinter.

    Umso mehr kann man Diejenigen verstehen, die zurueckgehen, um ihren Kindern eine vernuenftige Ausbildung zu ermoeglichen. Der Unterschied zwischen Thailand und den Nachbarlaendern der noch dazukommt, selbst Privatschulen schneiden hier sehr schlecht ab. Aehnlich ist eigentlich nur Indonesien (voellig ueberteuert gemessen an der Qualitaet), aber da ist die Grundausbildung / public schools dann doch um Welten derer in Thailand voraus

  7. #6
    Avatar von strike

    Registriert seit
    08.12.2007
    Beiträge
    28.011
    Zitat Zitat von MadMac Beitrag anzeigen
    Die Uniformen haben die doch alle, egal ob Lehrer, Dorfvorsteher, Schrankenwart oder Schreibtischfutzi. ....
    Das enttaeuscht mich jetzt.
    Hatte wenigstens da Weltklasse Niveau im thailaendischen Bildungssystem vermutet.



    Ernsthaft: das duerfte fuer jedes thai-deutsche Paar eine der groessten Herausforderungen sein, ihren Kindern in TH eine angemessene Ausbildung zukommen zu lassen.
    Das Problem wird auch durch die Tatsache, dass die Schulausbildung in D immer mieser wird, nicht kleiner.

  8. #7
    Avatar von Dieter1

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2004
    Beiträge
    32.014
    Zitat Zitat von strike Beitrag anzeigen
    Ernsthaft: das duerfte fuer jedes thai-deutsche Paar eine der groessten Herausforderungen sein, ihren Kindern in TH eine angemessene Ausbildung zukommen zu lassen.
    Eine international anerkannte Ausbildung in Thailand zu erwerben, ist ein Ding der Unmoeglichkeit.

  9. #8
    Avatar von nakmuay

    Registriert seit
    01.01.2013
    Beiträge
    1.323
    Der merklich angepisste Ton spricht halt evtl. auch nicht unbedingt für Objektivität... (20% Preisanstieg in den letzten 5 Jahren??)

    Klar ist viel Wahrheit dabei... jedoch gibt es auch zb einige Unis hier, die völlig in Ordnung sind.

  10. #9
    Avatar von MadMac

    Registriert seit
    06.02.2002
    Beiträge
    22.422
    Zitat Zitat von nakmuay Beitrag anzeigen
    (20% Preisanstieg in den letzten 5 Jahren??)
    Da hast Du natuerlich recht, der ist hoeher als 20%.

  11. #10
    Avatar von Dieter1

    Registriert seit
    10.08.2004
    Beiträge
    32.014
    Zitat Zitat von nakmuay Beitrag anzeigen
    Der merklich angepisste Ton spricht halt evtl. auch nicht unbedingt für Objektivität... (20% Preisanstieg in den letzten 5 Jahren??)

    Klar ist viel Wahrheit dabei... jedoch gibt es auch zb einige Unis hier, die völlig in Ordnung sind.
    Es gibt sicher Unis, die ok sind. Was immer Du darunter verstehen magst.

    Aber welche davon besitzt denn echtes internationales Renommee Du kleiner Traeumer ?

Seite 1 von 39 12311 ... LetzteLetzte

Ähnliche Themen

  1. Infos zu Education Visa
    Von Ahriman im Forum Behörden & Papiere
    Antworten: 13
    Letzter Beitrag: 08.07.11, 11:04
  2. Antworten: 6
    Letzter Beitrag: 15.07.07, 12:12